Blog > gender diversity

ECJ Rules that Self-Employed LGBTQ Workers Should Not Face Discrimination

ECJ Rules that Self-Employed LGBTQ Workers Should Not Face Discrimination

In a landmark ruling, the European Court of Justice (ECJ) has held that self-employed individuals who identify as LGBTQ should not face discrimination in the provision of services. The ruling comes after a self-employed graphic designer in Austria, who identified as gay, claimed that he was refused work by a printing company on the grounds of his sexual orientation.

The ECJ found that the prohibition of discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation applies to self-employed individuals in the provision of services, and that national laws which allow discrimination against self-employed individuals in such circumstances are not compatible with EU law. The court further held that national courts must interpret national laws in line with EU law, and that individuals who have suffered discrimination must be entitled to compensation.

This ruling is an important step forward in protecting the rights of self-employed LGBTQ individuals across the EU. It sends a clear message that discrimination on the grounds of sexual orientation is not acceptable in any context, and that self-employed individuals are entitled to the same protections as employees.

However, the ruling also raises important questions about how self-employed individuals can effectively enforce their rights under EU law. Self-employed individuals may face unique challenges in accessing legal remedies and pursuing claims of discrimination, particularly in the absence of an employer or union to represent them. It is therefore important for national governments to ensure that self-employed individuals have access to effective legal remedies and support.

Furthermore, this ruling highlights the need for greater awareness and understanding of the rights of self-employed individuals, particularly those who face intersectional discrimination. Self-employed individuals who identify as LGBTQ, or who belong to other marginalized groups, may face multiple forms of discrimination and may be particularly vulnerable to social and economic exclusion.

In conclusion, the ECJ's ruling is an important step forward in protecting the rights of self-employed LGBTQ individuals across the EU. However, it also highlights the need for greater awareness and support for self-employed individuals, and the need for national governments to ensure that self-employed individuals have access to effective legal remedies and support.